I am for an Autism cure, that doesn’t mean I’m ablest.

I am not ablest in any shape or form. This view is a decision I’ve made from personal experience. I have nothing against Autism or other Autistics. I would like a cure for Autism because this would help me have a life that means something. The life I would have had if it hadn’t been for having Autism. I would have been able to secure employment, not been labelled a criminal and not lost my son to adoption. I went through all of that because of mostly the stigma of an Autism diagnosis and people misunderstanding me as a person due to my Autism. I would take a cure if it was given to me tomorrow. I would take it more if I was cured and could have that life back which would have been if it wasn’t for having Autism. In all honesty, I’d probably take part in the most potentially dangerous trials if it meant that it could lead to an Autism cure. Those that don’t want to cure their Autism certainly shouldn’t be pushed to take the cure option if it ever does become available. There are those of us that would take that cure for our Autism. Those of us that ever admit to wanting that normally get a lot of hate from the Autistic community slung in our direction.

I just want to explain why some of us want a cure for our Autism. I find that the biggest hurdle is relationships. I don’t feel like I’m on a level playing field. There are many people I’ve liked over the years that I would never have a chance to date because of my Autism. I am just not in their league due to my Autism parts that they’d never ever love. I’ve not always been a negative person. I just ended up negatively looking at relationships and even friendships because I crossed paths with so many people that would never be in my league due to my Autism. Those people were above me in relationship and friendship leagues. I’m realistic nowadays. I would rather be on my own that feel left out because my Autism makes me feel so below others. I may have been conditioned to think this way due to my experiences but that forms my opinion in regards to being for a cure.

We always seem to have to settle for less due to Autism. I was born with ambition until it was made out to be a waste of time after my Autism diagnosis. I was okay when I was younger because I still had the determination and wasn’t yet exhausted having to fight the stigma for years on end. I don’t have any chance of having a career with my criminal record (given to me due to my Autism traits) now. I see others crossing boundaries and giving the non-Autistic people perks that they’d never give Autistics. I’m kept at arms length like some kind of disease. Then I see others freely being allowed to do what they want and not being rejected. We can never have the ones that we want in our lives because they are above us. Instead, we have to settle for people that also are disabled in the forms of Autistic or Learning disabled etc. I don’t mind being friends with others who are Autistic etc. However, when it comes to a relationship, I don’t want to be with a disabled person. I know that sounds absolutely awful but it’s the truth. I will be friends with anyone but I’d only be in a relationship with a non-autistic. I have worked hard in my life to settle with a neurotypical partner. I’m not trying to be discriminative or ablest but I know that being with a neurotypical partner is the only way I can have a chance of having more children that I can keep in my care. If I got together with another disabled person then the system would definitely find a way to take any future children of mine. This is why I’d go for a cure if one ever became available. I wouldn’t have to settle for less than I deserve because of how others see Autistic people. 

One thought on “I am for an Autism cure, that doesn’t mean I’m ablest.

  1. You’re of course entitled to your beliefs after such an experience.

    I come from a generation in which girls were not diagnosed in childhood – it was the Sixties. No one was stigmatizing me for preconceived ideas about autism, but I did get a lot of bullying and misunderstanding, which I tried to cope with by trying to understand other people, and taking time off from them when it was too much.

    I learned there are some people I don’t want in my life, but often they’re people nobody else should want, either. I definitely do not need narcissists, users and people so conventional that if my being an Aspie didn’t offend them, my queerness, intelligence and general non-conformity would have done so anyway. My life is hard, but I am free.

    There’s a difference between autism and the stigmas of society. I comply enough to avoid breaking the law, but I refuse to accept that society’s fad of the day is worth more than autistic me. When I was young, single women weren’t even allowed to have a credit card! Society can be wrong. It’s not a true guideline by itself.

    All I’m asking is that you try to see why, for people like me who have struggled so hard all our lives to have a space to be able to breathe, letting the stigma bigots take even that away would feel fatal. I’ve been able to do good work and have good people in the spaces I carve out.

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