I’m trying not to react here. But I know who my troll may be and it’s vendetta territory.

I’ve left the comment which the troll has left on a previous blog entry (the one titled Yawn… this is getting old). This is only a small fraction of what has been directed at me. The person has been trying to destroy me for years just because I cut her off due to calling child protection on me when I was pregnant after sending me baby clothes. She befriended me on lots of different profiles during my pregnancy and afterwards pretending to be friends within the Autism circle that supported me. The reason why she did this to me was because her children were taken by child protection due to her mental health issues. Only difference is that her children were Autistic so they went into long term foster care. Those of us that came across her in the Autism and Forced Adoption groups that she falsely reported weren’t so lucky. We have all lost our children because of her vindictive reporting. She is completely nuts and she’ll stop at nothing to destroy our lives. It’s more dangerous since she’s doing a law degree at the Open Uni now. A person like that is highly dangerous on a toxic level with that kind of degree.

I try not to get worried by her vindictiveness but she’s threatened and succeeded in ruining parts of my life several times. The Police wouldn’t do anything every single time I’ve reported her. I had her threats and proof that she’d carried it out but they wouldn’t touch her. Others have done the same to try to get her prosecutedĀ  for stalking us and maliciously trying to ruin our lives. I don’t want her carrying out her threats to make sure I never see my son when he grows up. That is what the last comment on there was about. I have friends of mine that can back me up about how long she’s had this vendetta against me. I don’t believe she’ll stop until I have nothing and no future…. exactly what the threat said in the comment.

16 thoughts on “I’m trying not to react here. But I know who my troll may be and it’s vendetta territory.

  1. Dear Emma, I’ve been following your blog for nearly a year now: I’m the guy in Amsterdam with a 14-year-old daughter with PDA (undiagnosed, because it “doesn’t exist” according to the Dutch care system). This is a diagnosis based on our own research (my wife is a psychologist and has been researching this for the best part of 18 months, but, as many parents have stated on the pda society website, parents are not taken seriously, the care system always knows better, and ultimately it’s blamed on the parents).
    I’m writing to you because I really admire your strength in your isolated situation (by which I mean that it is clear that the care system has not offered you the help you specifically requested, nor do they acknowledge your honest and clear self-assessment of your own PDA traits, yet you soldier on altruistically and dedicate yourself to raising awareness about PDA).
    It will come as no surprise to you that the health services have only offered us unsuitable care for our daughter, people who either try to talk her into going back to school or offering her ultimatums if she doesn’t comply with their demands, all of which only add to her resistance.
    I’d like to ask you a question, because I feel you are more qualified to answer than any ‘experts’ we’ve encountered here in the Netherlands.
    Our daughter refuses to brush her teeth, refuses to go outdoors, refuses to shower, primarily because these are demands made on her by the services (and also by her parents, although we have developed various strategies over the past few years to achieve a modicum of success.) However, on the rare occasions that she does have a friend come round for a short visit, or volunteer to accompany us on a trip, her first priority will be to brush her hair, change her clothes, and brush her teeth. She is very aware that hygiene and outward appearance are important factors in society, and, after all, she’s a young teenager, and doesn’t want to stand out as appearing strange, scruffy or smelly
    Did you ever experience anything like this in your own development? it’s clear from your blog (and your photos) that you do take good care of yourself, was there a turning point for you, or was this never a factor in your personal situation?
    I’m sorry to use your blog as an online helpline, but to be honest, we’re running out of options to help our daughter, and the only alternatives on offer now are a voluntary institution where she can live with children her own age during the week (home for the weekends), where she could slowly get back into studying a few hours a day, or being locked up for an indefinite period of time in an institution with a random collection of drug addicts, suicide attempts, anorexics and psychotics, and where we as parents will no longer have any say in how she will be treated (which of course means she’ll be pumped full of sedatives to ease the workload of the caregivers, something she absolutely does not need, because she exhibits no violent tendencies whatsoever). She refuses the former alternative, because it’s voluntary, and she knows that we as parents so want it for her, especially because we still have a say in her situation, and if it doesn’t work out for her, she can leave anytime. The latter option is unthinkable, a road of no return in our opinion.
    In summary, if there is any advice that you can offer, I’d be eternally grateful.
    By the way, I wrote to you once many months ago that if you ever felt like a break from your situation,
    you’d be welcome to visit in Amsterdam. My motives are also a bit selfish because I truly believe that if our daughter had contact with someone who had managed to pull through the same struggles as she is experiencing, it would help her enormously.
    At the same time, I am fully aware that such an offer should be treated with great suspicion (the world is full of strange people after all, and internet doesn’t help matters much), and should you consider it at all I would provide any and all proof you would request to put your mind at ease about us being genuine, and of course pay all expenses (and a cat-minder, we have four in the house and know how demanding they can be:)
    Kind regards, Stefan Osadzinski, Amsterdam, NL

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    1. Hi. I remember you. I never had those specific issues but my appearance has always been quite important to me. I don’t really dress up anymore since I got depression quite badly. However, I simply cannot go a day without a Bath because this is my routine. This was even the same when I was in Prison after I got used to the environment. Luckily we had Baths and Showers at the Prison. I’ve always struggled with school and college rules. I have always got kicked out a lot. I subsequently have never passed my Maths GCSE and feel that it is hard for me to progress. I don’t feel successful coping with this PDA thing because in my eyes I haven’t got where I want to be in life. I didn’t get all my qualifications, lost my son to adoption and been labelled a Criminal due to others having no understanding or even attempting to discuss things rather than jump into situations.

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  2. Thanks for your reply Emma,
    I think if anyone should be labelled a criminal then it’s the person responsible for the lack of funding in the care sector. Please believe me when I say that reading your posts have helped me understand some issues I recognise in my daughter. You might not be where you want to be in life yet, but you’ll get there, you strike me as a determined woman who will not accept defeat easily. There is a lot more to life than a set of academic qualifications, and you have a talent for honest and informative writing. I wish you all the best,
    Kind regards, Stefan Osadzinski

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    1. I always wanted to be an academic though. I feel quite disappointed that I don’t even have close friends in life.

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      1. I only sent it to you as evidence that academic results aren’t the be-all and end-all of academic intelligence and talent, and in your case, your writing proves that you possess both, let alone the fact that you can run a blog spot efficiently, which is more than I can get my head round. Then again, at age 58 I’m from a different generation and didn’t grow up with computer skills, although you obviously picked these up yourself, seeing as you have stated that you didn’t attend school on a very regular basis. And from your previous posts I gather you succeeded in passing your Law GCSE, which is a huge achievement by yourself.
        I didn’t touch upon your comment about close friends because I don’t know you so don’t want to spout hot air and platitudes on that topic. I gather you choose not to be around people that much and find it hard to trust others based on how you have been treated (I’m not playing amateur psychiatrist here, just referring to what you have written in the past), so that would obviously make it harder to make good friends, but that doesn’t mean things can’t be different in the future. Nothing in this life is permanent.

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      2. I don’t even want to go out to attempt to make friends anymore because of what I’ve been through.

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      3. I can’t blame you, I’m not a ‘party person’ myself, although when I do go out I have to cringe at the chat-up
        lines that get thrown around by the ‘lads’ and how often they won’t take ‘no’ for an answer. My wife, although only a little younger than me, certainly looks at least 20 years younger and is a violinist who performs with DJ’s in clubs, and she gets very fed up of the cr*p she has to deal with sometimes. I’m not a great believer in friendships starting in places where you have to shout over loud music to make yourself understood, let alone being a woman going out alone.
        Apart from anything else, you don’t need an address book full of friends. I could count my good friends on the fingers of two hands, and I feel very lucky to be able to do so. (And to be honest, I’m including at least two of my four cats, faithful to the end, if a little selfish when it comes to occupying bed space).
        I would add though that I have had phases in my life when I have felt very depressed about certain issues, angry at the world (I have travelled a lot for various NGO’s, without going into further detail) and in those periods I might as well have had a neon sign hanging round my neck flashing ‘leave me alone’. I know this can become a vicious circle, I’m not trying to suggest that you should go out and pretend to be deliriously happy with your lot in order to make friends, but sometimes a little contact with the outside world, even though it can at times be negative, is better than no contact at all (I have to add an IMHO here, what used to work for me doesn’t necessarily have to work for you).

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      4. Yes, but a true friend (and they are to be found) will recognise the smile as a cover, and still support you no matter what. From what I see on your blog site, you might find those easier to find in the Wiccan community
        (I’m no expert on that field, but have had a fair amount of contact in Ireland with Wiccans and specifically Druids, I can think of no warmer folk than that, and they certainly accept people at their face value more readily than much of western society).
        I wish you a good night (it’s one hour later here, and my days start very early…)

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